Central district – North Central Conference http://northcentralconference.org/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 03:37:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://northcentralconference.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/north.png Central district – North Central Conference http://northcentralconference.org/ 32 32 Banned cannabis joins Central District as industry fairness efforts continue https://northcentralconference.org/banned-cannabis-joins-central-district-as-industry-fairness-efforts-continue/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 20:30:00 +0000 https://northcentralconference.org/banned-cannabis-joins-central-district-as-industry-fairness-efforts-continue/ by Justin Carder (This article originally appeared on the Capitol Hill Seattle Blog and has been reprinted by arrangement.) A family of Washington pottery shops now stretches from the banks of the Columbia to the Central District. Forbidden Cannabis Club opens Friday on East Union. Meanwhile, Seattle has a new set of policies that hope […]]]>

by Justin Carder

(This article originally appeared on the Capitol Hill Seattle Blog and has been reprinted by arrangement.)


A family of Washington pottery shops now stretches from the banks of the Columbia to the Central District. Forbidden Cannabis Club opens Friday on East Union.

Meanwhile, Seattle has a new set of policies that hope to improve fairness in the city’s cannabis industry.

The CHS reported in July the central district pottery shop purchase agreement Reflect and his coveted East Union property for both the value of its land and its cannabis license just down the street from the headquarters of one of the city’s leading pot retailers, Uncle Ike’s.

With the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Commission’s approval of the transfer, the deal is now complete and Forbidden has announced its grand opening on September 23 with promotions and sale pricing.

The Forbidden Crew in Lacey, Washington. (Photo: Cannabis prohibited)

The acquisition adds a new Forbidden Cannabis store to a family of retail stores that includes locations in Carson, Lacey, Okanogan, Olympia and now East Union.

Forbidden’s ownership includes industry veteran Saranjit Bassi, who sued the town of Bonney Lake over its cannabis retail ban. According to company filings, the East Union site will be run by Forbidden business partners Amandeep Ghag and Paul Sandhu.

The group will now enter a neighborhood pot retail battle with Uncle Ike’s on the land of its owner Ian Eisenberg.

The opening comes as Seattle introduced new legislation in response to the Cannabis Social Equity Task Force formed to address the lack of diverse ownership and working conditions issues for frontline corporate employees. of cannabis in the city.

Seattle Mayor Bruce Harrell signs cannabis fairness legislation seated at a table surrounded by onlookers
“The work that remains to come will highlight further opportunities to improve our current system, and I look forward to the recommendations that will result from the cannabis needs assessment,” Mayor Bruce Harrell said of of the cannabis equity legislation he signed into law last week. “This work will not be easy, but I believe that together we can foster an open conversation between workers, community members and industry leaders to identify common priorities and align with efforts to advance our shared values ​​of equity and restoration. (Photo: City of Seattle)

The legislative package Signed into law last week by Seattle Mayor Bruce Harrell, includes a bill that prepares the city to issue new “social equity licenses” for Seattle’s marijuana industry. The license could be a central element that would provide a new route to ownership for qualified contractors and should level the playing field for those seeking the coveted permits.

The origins of Washington and Seattle’s path to legal ownership of marijuana retail businesses included no effort to address diversity in the industry or historical inequity in drug law enforcement. . Most of the town’s original owners were award-winning white entrepreneurs for being the first to evolve as the industry took shape.

Ponder owner John Branch is an example of this, quietly opening Ponder in the Central District in 2015 as the second pot store in the neighborhood. One year earlier, Eisenberg had opened his first Uncle Ike store at 23rd and Union, and, for a time, the store sold more pot than any other in Seattle. Ponder continued as a quiet alternative to the flashier and more ambitious Ike.

Terms of the agreement with Forbidden were not disclosed and details of the planned property sale have yet to be made public in county records. The Forbidden Cannabis Club Seattle opens Friday at 2413 E. Union. Learn more about Forbidden Cannabis Club.


Justin Carder is the publisher and founder of the Capitol Hill Seattle blog.

📸 Image selected by Canna Obscura/shutterstock.com.

Before you move on to the next story …
Please consider that the article you just read was made possible by the generous financial support of donors and sponsors. The Emerald is a BIPOC-led nonprofit news outlet with the mission of offering a wider lens of our region’s most diverse, least affluent, and woefully under-reported communities. Please consider making a one-time gift or, better yet, joining our Rainmaker Family by becoming a monthly donor. Your support will help provide fair pay for our journalists and enable them to continue writing the important stories that offer relevant news, information, and analysis. Support the Emerald!

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New Moishe House Reflects Jewish Heritage in Seattle’s Central Neighborhood https://northcentralconference.org/new-moishe-house-reflects-jewish-heritage-in-seattles-central-neighborhood/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://northcentralconference.org/new-moishe-house-reflects-jewish-heritage-in-seattles-central-neighborhood/ Madison Holt, 22, graduated from Indiana University this year and moved to Seattle, in part because of its thriving Jewish community. Holt has been accepted to live in Seattle’s new Central neighborhood Moishe Housea cohabitation home for young Jewish adults in the same neighborhood where Seattle’s first Jewish community took root in the 1890s. After […]]]>

Madison Holt, 22, graduated from Indiana University this year and moved to Seattle, in part because of its thriving Jewish community.

Holt has been accepted to live in Seattle’s new Central neighborhood Moishe Housea cohabitation home for young Jewish adults in the same neighborhood where Seattle’s first Jewish community took root in the 1890s. After two years of pandemic distancing and living in a world where anti-Semitism is on the rise, Holt and his Moishe House roommates find solace and pride in the community they create in the CD.

Holt, who is from Bethesda, Md., said she regularly faced anti-Semitism on the Indiana campus. She was afraid of being Jewish; she had never felt like this at home. Just existing as a Jewish student was exhausting.

Instead of hiding her faith, Holt became more active in a group of Jewish students. The group set up mezuzas, a spiritually uplifting religious symbol, across campus. Holt realized the value of both having a tight-knit support system and celebrating one’s culture.

“Partnering and purposefully creating community has become my way of being, ‘I’m alive, I’m Jewish and I’m happy,'” Holt said.

At the Moishe House, Holt and his roommates, three other Jews in their twenties, do just that: create community. In fact, creating a community is within the rules of their cohabitation situation.

The non-profit organization Moishe House was founded in 2006 to solve a community problem for young Jews: those who were too old for college groups and too young for synagogues (more aimed at adults and full-fledged families ) had limited options for keeping in touch with their religious community.

In Moishe Houses, three to five residents (aged 21 to 32) live together in rent-subsidized houses, usually in the heart of major cities. Residents must organize about five community events a month for other young Jews.

Sixteen years after its foundation, more than 70,000 young living together in Moishe houses in more than 27 countries. At first, Moishe House tried to establish hubs mainly in places with small existing Jewish communities, according to a New York Times article. In Seattle, Moishe House is now doing something new: bringing Jewish history to life.

Back to basics

The new Seattle home, which replaced a Moishe House in North Seattle that closed in 2021 and joins a two-person ‘pod’ in South Seattle, establishes a Jewish community in a neighborhood that Jews helped to to build.

At the time, from the 1890s until World War I, Sephardi Jews established temples, delis, markets, and their lives in the Central District. Over time, they left and settled in Seattle’s more suburban neighborhoods, like Seward Park.

Moishe House roommate Clara Prizont, 24, who grew up in Seward Park as an Orthodox Jew, knows the legacy of her community’s past in the Central District.

Every time his mother walked past the Church of God in Christ at Tolliver Temple in the Central District, she would say, “That was our synagogue! The church still bears stars of David, signs of his past life like the Bikur Holim Sephardic Synagogue.

“Anyone who’s been in the Jewish community in Seattle is like, ‘Oh, the central district?'” Prizont said. “‘Are you going back?'”

Of course, the landscape of the Central District has changed considerably. After the Jewish community left, the neighborhood became Seattle’s predominantly black neighborhood and remained so for decades. These days, well over half of the central district is white. Much of this demographic change is related to rising rents and soaring house prices.

In Seattle, where rents are up nearly 25% over the same period last year, the Maison Moishe rent subsidy can make a difference for young people trying to live in the city.

Prizont, a community tie associated with the Jewish Family Service of Seattle, could not afford to live in the Central District without Moishe House. The nonprofit organization is subsidizing their $5,500 rent by 50%.

Prizont explained how she and her roommates intentionally bring together elements of historic Jewry and new Jewry. For their first house event in August, Leschi Market — a Jewish family business that was based in CD in the 1940s — donated food.

The history and the community remain, Prizont said, even though the Jewish population has shrunk. She described a bus stop not far from the Moishe house covered in Yiddish words.

“It’s a bit underground,” she said, “but there’s still a very vibrant Jewish community in the CD.”

A new type of Jewish community

Before moving here, Holt knew she would be welcome in Seattle, that she would have a place to call home. And just weeks after getting to know each other, she and Prizont got along like old friends. Prizont had already given him a nickname: “Moose”.

Still, it was hard to shake off old habits and fears.

“The first week I was here,” Holt said, “I asked if it was safe to wear my Jewish star.”

His roommates assured him that everything was fine, but the basic instinct isn’t necessarily unique, even to Seattle Jews. Nationally, the Anti-Defamation League recorded 2,717 anti-Semitic acts in 2021, a 35% increase compared to 2020. Washington state recorded 45 anti-Semitic incidents in 2021 and 50 in 2020. In January, a rabbi found hate graffiti a block from his job at the Jewish Family Service building in Seattle, near the central district.

“Security is something we think about a lot,” Prizont said. “We do not publish our address online.”

Surrounding yourself with the community helps allay some fears associated with life in the United States where nearly 25% of young Americans believe the Holocaust did not happen or believe in conspiracies that the tragedy has been exaggerated.

Prizont, Holt and their two other roommates host events throughout the month to bring Jewish young adults together, like an evening of astrology and Judaism for Rosh Hashana, the Jewish New Year. On days when they are not holding events, Holt said Moishe House has an unofficial open-door policy. Anyone can pass. And people do.

According to Moishe House West Coast Advancement Manager Nicole Tafoya, 76% of Moishe House residents said their participation in the program had helped them cope with the pandemic.

Now that we’re slowly emerging from the social hibernation of COVID-19, Prizont and Holt said they think people are craving for in-person human connection. They have seen a great response to the events they have held so far including song sessions, fundraising night for homeless youth, bagel brunches, Shabbat dinner with food local Ethiopian and more.

Tafoya explained that these social opportunities are all part of the nonprofit’s mission to facilitate a connection to the Jewish community for young people.

“Rather than prescribing one way to be Jewish or to build a Jewish community,” Tafoya said via email, “young adults are empowered and supported with the tools to explore their own identities and cultures, and therefore , find deeper and more relevant ways to build their own Jewish life.

Each member of Moishe House in Seattle’s Central District has a different relationship with Judaism. For example, Prizont was raised Orthodox, but is no longer so, and Holt was raised with a Jewish mother and a Catholic father.

“No matter how Jewish you are — and even if you’re not Jewish — you’re welcome at Moishe House,” Holt said.

]]> Central District’s Byrd Barr Place Expands Programming in Renovated Historic Space https://northcentralconference.org/central-districts-byrd-barr-place-expands-programming-in-renovated-historic-space/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 22:39:59 +0000 https://northcentralconference.org/central-districts-byrd-barr-place-expands-programming-in-renovated-historic-space/ by Ronnie Estoque Byrd Barr Square has served the Central District community since the 1960s. Recent renovation of the historic building by the organization Fire Station No. 23 at 722 18th Ave allows them to return to space with increased programming capacity, which includes food and energy and housing assistance as well as financial tools […]]]>

by Ronnie Estoque


Byrd Barr Square has served the Central District community since the 1960s. Recent renovation of the historic building by the organization Fire Station No. 23 at 722 18th Ave allows them to return to space with increased programming capacity, which includes food and energy and housing assistance as well as financial tools to more than 1,100 households each week.

“While we were doing our renovations, our temporary locations were spread out, we had our market working from a location in Capitol Hill, and then all of our other programs and our administrative side working from SoDo,” Tafari Maynard, Byrd Barr Place’s COO, said. “Not having that distance anymore makes everyone really happy and excited to be back together.”

Byrd Barr Place has renamed its food bank to “The Market”, allowing customers to select the food items they want when visiting. Maynard says they tried to give it a “grocery store aesthetic.”

“We’re trying to get away from the kind of stigma of food banks where people line up, they don’t have options,” Maynard said. “We really wanted to make sure people had a place to hang out while they waited for access.”

  • Photo depicting a group of customers browsing the products in the market.  The blue wall with white text that says, "good things always" is painted above the bins.

The building renovation also includes several community spaces that guests can access during their visit. According to Andrea Cauapin Sanderson, CEO of Byrd Barr Place, the acquisition of the building took almost 10 years of discussions with the City.

The Byrd Barr Place board initially discussed how renting the property was making its business unstable, as the town refused to enter into a long-term lease. Originally, Byrd Barr Place requested a multi-year lease, which eventually turned into discussions over ownership.

“Finally, the Mayor and City Council agreed to transfer the building in the fall of 2020. We had legal representation working with the city’s legal team to move the transfer forward and the actual transfer took place in November 2020. after City Council approval,” Sanderson said. “Many told us that it was not possible, to get it from the hands of the city of Seattle, to raise the $12.8 million needed to complete the necessary renovations and to actually do them in the middle of the pandemic.”

Byrd Barr Place was able to raise funds for the renovations through a combination of loans, tax credits, grants and donations. Although they were unsuccessful in obtaining funding at the federal level, Byrd Barr Place was successful at the state and city level. They have also collaborated with several other non-profit organizations in the Rise Together fundraising campaign build capacity to raise funds from private sources.

“We had a team of very wealthy individuals who came together to leverage their networks and their own dollars to make sure this was fully funded,” Sanderson said.

According to Sanderson, 42% of Byrd Barr Place’s current patrons are black. The nonprofit organization also serves a large immigrant and refugee population within the city limits of Seattle, which is at or below the federal poverty level.

“[Our clients] range from the elderly, people with disabilities, people with young children and people with chronic illnesses,” Sanderson said. “We are seeing an increase in the number of newcomers to poverty; they have college degrees and had a way to take care of themselves financially but, after the pandemic, they lost their resources.

Maynard also expressed excitement about the return of original customers and community members to the renovated space. He also acknowledged that the racial demographics of the historically black Central District have changed significantly due to gentrification and that Byrd Barr Place is a “staple of Seattle’s black community.”

“It’s a bit what motivates me, it’s to be able to come and join the legacy of a fight of which I consider myself a part… [Byrd Barr Place] was born out of the civil rights movement, and I still think of us as a civil rights organization. Being a part of this is humbling and something I’m really proud of.


Ronnie Estoque is a freelance photographer and videographer based in South Seattle. You can follow his work by consulting his website.

📸 Feature Image: Byrd Barr Place is now operating with increased programming capacity following the recent refurbishment of its building in the Central District. (Photo: Ronnie Estoque)

Before you move on to the next story …
Please consider that the article you just read was made possible by the generous financial support of donors and sponsors. The Emerald is a BIPOC-led nonprofit news outlet with the mission of offering a wider lens of our region’s most diverse, least affluent, and woefully under-reported communities. Please consider making a one-time gift or, better yet, joining our Rainmaker Family by becoming a monthly donor. Your support will help provide fair pay for our journalists and enable them to continue writing the important stories that offer relevant news, information, and analysis. Support the Emerald!

]]>
Martin Estrada sworn in as United States Attorney for the Central District of California https://northcentralconference.org/martin-estrada-sworn-in-as-united-states-attorney-for-the-central-district-of-california/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 18:27:15 +0000 https://northcentralconference.org/martin-estrada-sworn-in-as-united-states-attorney-for-the-central-district-of-california/ Press Releases are displayed on Independent.com as free community service. LOS ANGELES –Martin Estrada was sworn in today as United States Attorney for the Central District of California. Estrada, 45, was sworn in by U.S. District Chief Judge Philip S. Gutierrez in a private ceremony this morning. Estrada now oversees the largest United States Attorney’s […]]]>

Press Releases are displayed on Independent.com as free community service.


LOS ANGELES –Martin Estrada was sworn in today as United States Attorney for the Central District of California.

Estrada, 45, was sworn in by U.S. District Chief Judge Philip S. Gutierrez in a private ceremony this morning.

Estrada now oversees the largest United States Attorney’s Office outside of Washington, D.C. The office, which currently employs approximately 270 attorneys, serves approximately 20 million residents in Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, Ventura, Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo.

E.Martin Estrada | Credit: Courtesy

After being confirmed by the US Senate on September 13, Estrada was nominated for a four-year term by President Joe Biden.

“I am deeply honored to return to the United States Attorney’s Office and have the opportunity to serve the people of this district,” Estrada said. “As head of this office, I will focus on protecting our community, safeguarding the rights of every individual in this district, and upholding the rule of law. I will also work to further develop the office’s relationship with federal, state, and local law enforcement and with our community partners. Working together, we will always put the people of this neighborhood first.”

Prior to becoming a United States Attorney, Estrada was a partner at the law firm Munger, Tolles & Olson, where he focused on trials, complex litigation and investigations. There, in addition to representing corporate clients, Estrada handled high-impact pro bono cases in the areas of education, immigration and equal justice.

Estrada is a Fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers. He was also an Adjunct Professor for Loyola Law School’s Ninth Circuit Appeals Clinic, part of the Alarcón Defense Project, where his teams achieved success for indigent clients.

From 2007 to 2014, Estrada served as Assistant United States Attorney for the Central District of California. As a federal prosecutor, Estrada served as Deputy Chief of the Violent and Organized Crime Section and International Organized Crime Coordinator. He has prosecuted a wide range of criminal offenses, including the nation’s largest racketeering prosecution targeting members and associates of Eurasian organized crime; one of the nation’s largest bank fraud and identity theft lawsuits, in which more than $8 million was stolen from elderly victims; and a major public corruption case involving the illegal leaking of sensitive and sealed information by a federal court clerk who tipped off organized crime figures before law enforcement could arrest them.

For his work as a prosecutor, Estrada received the prestigious U.S. Department of Justice Director’s Award for Superior Performance as well as other accolades.

Estrada graduated with honors from Stanford Law School and earned his undergraduate degree in history from the University of California, Irvine, where he graduated magna cum laude. Estrada clerked for U.S. District Judge Robert J. Timlin of the Central District of California and Judge Arthur L. Alarcón of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.

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Central District Daycare takes on climate change https://northcentralconference.org/central-district-daycare-takes-on-climate-change/ Wed, 31 Aug 2022 00:41:46 +0000 https://northcentralconference.org/central-district-daycare-takes-on-climate-change/ by Agueda Pacheco Flores When temperatures started to hit 100 degrees last summer, Lois Martin knew it didn’t matter how many fans she had – the Central District Children’s Day Community Center (CDCC) would have to close. “Our center is in a brick building built in the early 1900s, there is no central air conditioning […]]]>

by Agueda Pacheco Flores


When temperatures started to hit 100 degrees last summer, Lois Martin knew it didn’t matter how many fans she had – the Central District Children’s Day Community Center (CDCC) would have to close.

“Our center is in a brick building built in the early 1900s, there is no central air conditioning system,” said Martin, CDCC’s managing director and second-generation owner.

The center was founded by Martin’s mother, Lulu “Mama” Martin, in 1963. Since then, the global temperature has warmed by 1 degree Celsius. This single degree has created havoc, manifesting in extreme weather across the globe. In Seattle, it looked like temperatures reaching 108 degrees Fahrenheit on June 28, during a heat wave that lasted three weeks.

from washington The administrative code stipulates that indoor daycare temperatures cannot exceed 82 degrees Fahrenheit. For the CDCC, this meant being unable to care for almost 40 children whose parents still had to work on those days. Many CDCC parents are front-line workers such as medical professionals, educators, and subway workers.

“That’s at least 75 parents affected, and it’s branching out,” says Martin. “They had to call in grandparents, aunts, uncles, nannies.”

Martin decided to take matters into his own hands. She began a search for funding and almost a year later she is now able to keep her doors open. But finding the money was not easy. She received help from Central Zone Collaborative (CAC), a non-profit organization that helps small businesses in the Central District.

CAC executive director Dennis Comer said they first applied to the city for funding, but for a small business with a big need like the Community Day Center for Children, the six- to eight-month process sifting through environmental impact statements and bureaucratic checklists was just too much.

“A small business doesn’t have the ability or knowledge to attack this, and time was running out,” Comer said, adding that their petition for city funds continued to flow from department to department. ‘other. “Yet another bureaucratic hurdle preventing us from doing what needs to be done.”

Eventually, the nonprofit cut the $60,000 check to provide the daycare with the infrastructure it needed to withstand future heat waves. During the 2021 heat wave, at least 100 people died. Experts and Washington State Department of Health wait area experience longer and hotter summers due to climate change.

“It’s not a problem that goes away,” Comer said.

The center now has a ductless system consisting of four air conditioning units, one for each classroom. During this year’s brief heat wave, CDCC was able to keep its doors open and provide a cool place for its students and staff.

Martin says the center wasn’t the only child care provider to face heat-related hurdles. Seattle leaders who are part of the Greater Seattle Child Care Business Association have expressed among themselves the need to close their doors due to insufficient protections against the extreme heat.

“The bigger picture is that in King County during this time, thousands of families and children were likely affected,” Martin said. “How many places have had to close? The directors were like, ‘What are you doing? How do you handle this? »

While there currently exists grants available from Washington State to help child care centers Staff retention and payroll, as well as increasing their building capacity to take children, Martin laments that there is no specific funding for the improvement of the facilities. “I think the key is understanding the importance of investing in early care and education.”


Need relief from the next heat wave? Check out our South End cooling guide for resources to help keep you cool.


Agueda Pacheco Flores is a journalist specializing in Latinx culture and Mexican American identity. From Queretaro, Mexico, Pacheco Flores draws inspiration from her own bicultural upbringing as an undocumented immigrant and proud Washingtonian.

📸 Featured Image: (Photo: Lois Martin)

Before you move on to the next story …
Please consider that the article you just read was made possible by the generous financial support of donors and sponsors. The Emerald is a BIPOC-led nonprofit news outlet with the mission of offering a wider lens of our region’s most diverse, least affluent, and woefully under-reported communities. Please consider making a one-time gift or, better yet, joining our Rainmaker Family by becoming a monthly donor. Your support will help provide fair pay for our journalists and enable them to continue writing the important stories that offer relevant news, information, and analysis. Support the Emerald!

]]> Seattle police seek to identify man who attacked woman in Central District apartment building – KIRO 7 News Seattle https://northcentralconference.org/seattle-police-seek-to-identify-man-who-attacked-woman-in-central-district-apartment-building-kiro-7-news-seattle/ Wed, 17 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://northcentralconference.org/seattle-police-seek-to-identify-man-who-attacked-woman-in-central-district-apartment-building-kiro-7-news-seattle/ Seattle police are looking for a man they believe attacked a woman after he followed her to her apartment building on May 30. It happened just before 10 p.m. in the central district. Seattle police released surveillance footage showing the woman entering the complex and boarding the elevator. As she walked inside, a man appeared […]]]>

Seattle police are looking for a man they believe attacked a woman after he followed her to her apartment building on May 30.

It happened just before 10 p.m. in the central district. Seattle police released surveillance footage showing the woman entering the complex and boarding the elevator. As she walked inside, a man appeared at the door and forced it open.

The woman looked around as the man ran into the elevator. He punched and kicked her repeatedly. The attack lasted less than ten seconds but the woman is seen on the ground as the man left the building.

She suffered facial fractures and a concussion.

“If I were in his place, I would be really scared. It’s heartbreaking to see her like this,” said MD Chy, a resident who lives in the building.

Tom Frederick lived in the building with his family for three years.

“I hate to see this happen to anyone,” Frederick said. “You can tell the door was locked when the guy opened the door, the poor girl didn’t stand a chance.” He said he had never seen anything like this happen here before.

“If I could just open the door to get in, how can I say someone else won’t?” said Frederic.

Chy said the building should check these things regularly.

“They should do regular testing on that, the security door like they do the fire testing,” Chy said. The building is access controlled and if you don’t have a FOB you must be let in by a resident.

“I mean, I feel like I always have to be buzzed around and nobody ever wants to open the door,” said Carolyn Rosquita, who regularly visits her girlfriend.

Frederick said he wished he had known about it sooner.

“Not knowing it happened is more upsetting than anything,” he said. “It happened in May, why weren’t we informed?”

The man wanted by police is between 5′6″ and 5′10″ with a short, fair haircut. He wore a camouflage pattern shirt or jacket over a white T-shirt. Police said he also appeared to be walking with a hunched posture.

KIRO 7 has contacted the apartment complex for a comment and is awaiting a response.

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Central District Health ready for monkeypox arrival on Grand Island | Grand Island Local News https://northcentralconference.org/central-district-health-ready-for-monkeypox-arrival-on-grand-island-grand-island-local-news/ Tue, 09 Aug 2022 21:45:00 +0000 https://northcentralconference.org/central-district-health-ready-for-monkeypox-arrival-on-grand-island-grand-island-local-news/ Monkeypox is booming across the country. In time, he will come to Grand Island. The Central District Health Department, however, is ready for his arrival. The Jynneos vaccine is available to the community and CDHD has already started testing for the virus. “We expect to see cases here. We think it’s only a matter of […]]]>

Monkeypox is booming across the country. In time, he will come to Grand Island.

The Central District Health Department, however, is ready for his arrival.

The Jynneos vaccine is available to the community and CDHD has already started testing for the virus.

“We expect to see cases here. We think it’s only a matter of time before it happens this way, just like COVID and everything else,” said Jonna Mangeot, senior nurse in CDHD Community Health. “It can spread through fomites, but also through that skin-to-skin contact, and you think about upcoming sports seasons and that sort of thing.”

She added, “We’re just trying to prepare the whole community.”

No cases of monkeypox have yet been reported in the CDHD tri-county coverage area. Already, four doses have been administered to people who felt they were at high risk of exposure.

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Some people in the Grand Island area have been tested for monkeypox, with negative results.

Commercial tests are now available for monkeypox, and tests are available at the Nebraska Public Health Lab, Mangeot said.

Monkeypox is distinct from COVID, which is a respiratory virus.

Symptoms of monkeypox include chills, fever, swollen lymph nodes, rashes, and lesions. For some people, there may not be flu-like symptoms at first, but they can still be contagious.

“They’re contagious the whole time they have the rash, until the lesions are completely healed,” Mangeot said. “Even though there is new skin underneath and there is still dried skin on top, they are still contagious until that skin is completely healed.”

When COVID started, it suddenly appeared in places with high occupancy.

Its variants migrated and could be tracked, allowing agencies, including CDHD, to prepare.

This is the case now with monkeypox, Mangeot said.

“We are on the lookout for this heightened surveillance, with health alert networks across the state going to hospitals,” Mangeot said.

Contact tracing is also ongoing.

“They are asking people who have tested positive to name their contacts or do contact tracing and put them in touch with the local health department,” Mangeot said. “We’re doing this kind of contact tracing and trying to stop the spread, slow the spread, that way.”

Other vaccines arrived at the CDHD on Tuesday from the National Strategic Stock, Mangeot noted, as the agency remains vigilant.

“We are looking for cases,” she said. “We made a lot of phone calls and explained to people whether or not they had been exposed, if they were eligible for the vaccine, that is, if they had had an experience in the last 14 days with someone with monkeypox, or a sexual encounter in an area with a high incidence of monkeypox, such as New York or California, where they have established a public health emergency.”

Mangeot encourages people to get vaccinated against monkeypox.

“Vaccination against smallpox is what got us to eradication,” she said. “If people are at high risk, certainly having this vaccine would significantly reduce their risk.”

For more information, visit cdhd.ne.gov/resources/monkeypox.html.

]]> 1 person arrested after 5 intentionally started fires in Central District https://northcentralconference.org/1-person-arrested-after-5-intentionally-started-fires-in-central-district/ Tue, 09 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://northcentralconference.org/1-person-arrested-after-5-intentionally-started-fires-in-central-district/ A 27-year-old man suspected of intentionally starting five fires in the Central District on Monday has been arrested, according to the Seattle Fire and Police Department. The fires were started between 7:30 p.m. and 8:45 p.m. Monday, firefighters said, each involving nearby combustible materials. No injuries were reported. Police and firefighters intervened for the first […]]]>

A 27-year-old man suspected of intentionally starting five fires in the Central District on Monday has been arrested, according to the Seattle Fire and Police Department.

The fires were started between 7:30 p.m. and 8:45 p.m. Monday, firefighters said, each involving nearby combustible materials. No injuries were reported.

Police and firefighters intervened for the first time in a house in block 600 of 37e Avenue where a fire was started in the front of the house and in the back stairwell using chopped firewood, patio furniture and a propane grill, the service said. fire.

After responding, authorities received several more reports of fires in the area, according to the police.

A small fire was started outside a home in the 3400 block of East Terrace Street, the fire department said, adding it was put out by the resident.

The third and fourth fires were started outside homes in Block 500 of 31st Avenue, according to firefighters. One involved combustible materials at the back of a house and the other involved patio furniture near the front entrance of another house.

The fifth was placed in the 500 block of 30e Avenue, where patio cushions stacked near the back of a home were set on fire, firefighters said.

Fire investigators determined the fires were started intentionally, according to fire department spokesman David Cuerpo, and Seattle police are leading the arson investigation.

Following these fires, Seattle Fire shared these tips to reduce the risk of arson:

Excluding homes and businesses:

  • Clean up waste paper, grass, weeds, litter and anything that can burn around buildings.
  • Clear carports of all combustibles.
  • Keep dumpsters, recycling bins and yard waste containers at least 5 feet from walls and eave lines. Keep them in a secure area, if possible, and avoid letting them overfill.
  • Place locks on commercial dumpsters or keep them in a secure area. Locks may be available from your service provider. Use only metal or metal-lined containers. (Residential customers can call Seattle Public Utilities at 206-684-7665 to arrange delivery and installation of locks for recycling and trash cans.)
  • Trim shrubs from doors and windows to improve visibility.
  • Install outdoor motion sensor lights or consider leaving the lights on.
  • Secure gas grills or disconnect the propane tank and place it inside your garage.

On the inside homes and businesses:

  • For businesses, check fire and life safety systems, including fire extinguishers, to make sure they are working and up to code.
  • For homeowners, test smoke alarms to make sure they work.
  • Develop and practice a fire escape plan. Make sure this includes knowing all the outings and a meeting place.
  • If you have a fire extinguisher, know where it is and how to use it.
  • Keep exits clear of objects that could impede evacuation efforts.
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As Infant Formula Shortage Persists, Central District Health Department Plans Breastfeeding Workshop https://northcentralconference.org/as-infant-formula-shortage-persists-central-district-health-department-plans-breastfeeding-workshop/ Mon, 08 Aug 2022 17:43:42 +0000 https://northcentralconference.org/as-infant-formula-shortage-persists-central-district-health-department-plans-breastfeeding-workshop/ A breastfeeding workshop and celebratory event hosted by the Central District Health Department is scheduled for Thursday at the Grand Island Public Library. “Each August we like to do something special to recognize breastfeeding in our community and help bring partners together to help clients and other families breastfeed,” said Rachel Sazama, WIC Program Supervisor […]]]>

A breastfeeding workshop and celebratory event hosted by the Central District Health Department is scheduled for Thursday at the Grand Island Public Library.

“Each August we like to do something special to recognize breastfeeding in our community and help bring partners together to help clients and other families breastfeed,” said Rachel Sazama, WIC Program Supervisor of CDHD.

Nebraska’s Women, Infants and Children program provides free healthy food, breastfeeding support and nutrition information to program clients.

The workshop should be particularly beneficial as infant formula continues to be in short supply.

“We’ve had calls from moms specifically looking for ways to increase their milk supply because maybe they’re doing both,” said Nancy Esch, WIC lactation consultant. “With relactation, mothers who have stopped breastfeeding for weeks or months can relactate. It’s a process, but they can do it.

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The workshop will be scheduled from 2 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

A course will be offered in English at 2:30 p.m. and translated into Spanish at 3:30 p.m.

“For expectant moms here at WIC, if they wish, we are hosting a breastfeeding class via Zoom,” Esch said. “It’s a PowerPoint presentation that goes over the basics and benefits of breastfeeding, how to put your baby to the breast, and some of the newest research coming out.”

“It just gives them a real head start when they’re going to have their baby,” she added.

Breastfeeding may seem like an obvious and natural function, but there’s more to it.

“It’s a learned behavior. And it’s also a learned behavior for the newborn,” Esch said. “It’s like walking. It takes a while for this child to properly close the latch, and mom and baby work together as a dyad. We’re getting rid of some of those notions that it’s a simple task.

“We don’t make it look difficult either, but we’re there for them.”

While some people think WIC is a formula-based program, it is one of the largest breastfeeding promotion programs in the country.

CDHD has an 88% breastfeeding initiation rate, Sazama said.

“That means 88% of our babies have been breastfed at some point,” she said. “We’re really excited about it and trying to get them to breastfeed for as long as the moms want.”

CDHD is also experiencing a formula shortage, as have retailers since the spring, Sazama said.

“Right now, the WIC program has a waiver process so WIC customers can get different types of formulas,” she said. “Before, it was structured so you could only get one specific formula with your perks, so they increased that.”

People call daily to have their formula changed, Esch said.

“They call from the store, they can’t find the formula, and ask if they can please get a different brand, because it’s specific on their card,” she said. “We have this technology now that we can change it while they’re in the store to give them another formula so they don’t go without.”

Sazama and Esch both advocate the benefits of breastfeeding.

Esch described it as “absolutely the best baby food.”

“There are dangers in giving formula,” she said. “Formulated milk is not a sterile product. Breast milk is. Once the milk is established, it’s less time-consuming for moms. The health benefits are amazing. There are over 100,000 ingredients in breast milk. And it’s species specific. Mom prepares it for her baby.

She added: “I could go on for a very long time about the benefits.”

There are several lactation consultants in the Grand Island area, Esch noted.

Consultants include: Alycia Parker and Shawnee Williams at CHI Health St. Francis; Chelsey Kennedy and Brandi Stein at the CHI Women’s Clinic; Libby Crockett at the Grand Island Clinic; Tina Vettel at Grand Island Regional Medical Center; Julie Ahlman in Hastings Mary Lanning; and Jennifer Harney at Aurora Memorial Community Health.

No registration is necessary for Thursday’s breastfeeding workshop. The event is free and open to the public.

For more information on CDHD programs and services, visit www.cdhd.ne.gov.

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Standard Brewing in Seattle’s Central District has great beers and tacos. https://northcentralconference.org/standard-brewing-in-seattles-central-district-has-great-beers-and-tacos/ Mon, 08 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://northcentralconference.org/standard-brewing-in-seattles-central-district-has-great-beers-and-tacos/ Neutral Good and Lil Stinker Hazy IPA from Standard Brewing. Photo: Melissa Santos/Axios Standard Brewing in the Central District has intrigued me for months. A brewery that serves Tacos? And the cocktails? What is this place? The place: Standard brew2504 S.Jackson St. The atmosphere: A low-key brasserie with wooden booths – a pleasant change from […]]]>
Neutral Good and Lil Stinker Hazy IPA from Standard Brewing. Photo: Melissa Santos/Axios

Standard Brewing in the Central District has intrigued me for months. A brewery that serves Tacos? And the cocktails? What is this place?

The place: Standard brew2504 S.Jackson St.

The atmosphere: A low-key brasserie with wooden booths – a pleasant change from Seattle’s ubiquitous industrial elegance.

What is offered: 12 beers on tap, plus extra beer by the bottle.

  • They also serve cocktails (including sangria) and wine.

The verdict: Food-wise, the tacos are surprisingly good.

  • My favorite was the Hariyali Chicken Taco, which kept me guessing with its mix of mint, Fresno pepper and cilantro.
  • The friend request – a fried catfish sandwich served with potato wedges – is also worth a try.

On the drink side, I ordered the Lil Stinker Hazy IPA, which had nice strawberry notes, and the Neutral Good, a dry hopped lager that I would happily return to.

  • My friend ordered sour pecan, which she said was perfect for someone who craves the citrus of a margarita, but also loves bourbon.

To note: No children or dogs allowed – not even on the terrace.

Yes, but: You can get large cans – crowlers – goas well as pre-mixed cocktails to go.

Three tacos with green spiced meat and toppings in a basket.
Tacos at Standard Brewing. Photo: Melissa Santos

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