Central district – North Central Conference http://northcentralconference.org/ Sun, 22 May 2022 09:14:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://northcentralconference.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/north.png Central district – North Central Conference http://northcentralconference.org/ 32 32 Shanghai authorities shut down the Central District telling everyone to stay home ahead of mass Covid testing https://northcentralconference.org/shanghai-authorities-shut-down-the-central-district-telling-everyone-to-stay-home-ahead-of-mass-covid-testing/ Sat, 21 May 2022 15:43:59 +0000 https://northcentralconference.org/shanghai-authorities-shut-down-the-central-district-telling-everyone-to-stay-home-ahead-of-mass-covid-testing/ Shanghai authorities have shut down a central district and told all residents to stay at home – as all shops and supermarkets close until Tuesday. The Jingan district, named after an ancient Chinese temple, has closed to allow mass Covid testing to take place from tomorrow until May 24. All residents have been urged to […]]]>

Shanghai authorities have shut down a central district and told all residents to stay at home – as all shops and supermarkets close until Tuesday.

The Jingan district, named after an ancient Chinese temple, has closed to allow mass Covid testing to take place from tomorrow until May 24.

All residents have been urged to participate in mandatory testing to help the district “win the battle against the pandemic” after Shanghai announced its first new Covid cases outside quarantine zones in five days on Friday.

Authorities also announced that the use of all exit permits, which allow residents to leave their homes, has also been suspended until further notice.

Posted on the district’s WeChat account, the message read, “In order to further consolidate the results of epidemic prevention and control and gradually restore normal production and living order, our district will conduct three consecutive rounds of the May 22 to May 24.

“All residents and friends are requested to participate in this series of screenings, cooperate with prevention and control work as always, stay home patiently and protect themselves personally.”

The district’s closure comes after the head of the World Health Organization criticized China’s Zero Covid strategy and urged it to change its policy – as millions of Shanghai residents remain under brutal lockdown.

Shanghai authorities have closed a central district and told all residents to stay at home – as all shops and supermarkets must close

Jingan district, named after an ancient Chinese temple, has closed to allow mass Covid testing to take place from tomorrow until May 24.  Pictured: A quarantined man plays badminton in the yard amid the ongoing Covid-19 lockdown in Shanghai, China on Saturday

Jingan district, named after an ancient Chinese temple, has closed to allow mass Covid testing to take place from tomorrow until May 24. Pictured: A quarantined man plays badminton in the yard amid the ongoing Covid-19 lockdown in Shanghai, China on Saturday

Quarantined people gather outside their residential compound in Shanghai on Saturday

Quarantined people gather outside their residential compound in Shanghai on Saturday

China has recorded more than 760,000 new Covid cases since ultra-infectious Omicron variants broke China's super-tight restrictions in March - although there are doubts about the reliability of the data.  This figure includes semi-autonomous Hong Kong

China has recorded more than 760,000 new Covid cases since ultra-infectious Omicron variants broke China’s super-tight restrictions in March – although there are doubts about the reliability of the data. This figure includes semi-autonomous Hong Kong

In a rare rebuke from the Communist Party, which is one of the health agency’s biggest financial contributors, WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said earlier this month that the strategy does not was not viable.

“As we all know, the virus evolves, changes its behaviors, becomes more transmissible,” he said. “With this change in behavior, changing your measurements will be very important.

“When we talk about a zero-Covid strategy, we don’t think it’s sustainable.” He added: “Given the behavior of the virus, I think a change [in China’s strategy] will be very important.

The WHO had previously been criticized as too “China-centric” during the pandemic and was accused of failing to publicly challenge Chinese misinformation in early 2020.

Chinese censors have already censored Dr Tedros’ comments, with searches for the hashtags “Tedros” and “WHO” on popular social media platform Weibo returning no results.

WeChat app users were also unable to share articles posted on the official account of a UN health agency.

People rest outside their homes in a quarantined residential compound amid the ongoing Covid-19 lockdown in Shanghai, China

People rest outside their homes in a quarantined residential compound amid the ongoing Covid-19 lockdown in Shanghai, China

The WHO had already been criticized as too

The WHO had previously been criticized as too ‘China-centric’ during the pandemic and was accused of failing to publicly challenge Chinese misinformation in early 2020

Pictured: Workers deliver goods to a quarantined residential complex in Shanghai

Pictured: Workers deliver goods to a quarantined residential complex in Shanghai

Official Chinese modeling used to justify sticking to Zero Covid warned that abandoning it now would trigger a “tsunami” of infections and kill 1.6 million people this summer.

Meanwhile, state media reported that Shanghai is aiming to end its Covid lockdown and return to “normal life” by June 1.

More than 40 Chinese cities are under total or partial containment measures, according to estimates by the Japanese firm Nomura. China has spent the past two years criticizing the West for overseeing so many virus deaths, making it politically difficult for the Chinese government to back away from the Zero Covid policy.

Dr Tedros’ comments were echoed by Mike Ryan, the WHO’s emergencies chief, who said all actions to combat the pandemic should “show due respect for individual and human rights”.

Residents line up for mass COVID testing on Wednesday, May 11, 2022 in Beijing.  (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

Residents line up for mass COVID testing on Wednesday, May 11, 2022 in Beijing. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

Blue Sky rescue team members disinfect a residential community during the gradual lockdown triggered by the COVID-19 outbreak on April 24, 2022 in Shanghai, China

Blue Sky rescue team members disinfect a residential community during the gradual lockdown triggered by the COVID-19 outbreak on April 24, 2022 in Shanghai, China

Countries must “balance control measures, impact on society, impact on the economy”. It’s not always an easy calibration to do,” Dr. Ryan said.

China is one of the last countries to cling to the strategy of eliminating the virus that was abandoned months ago by countries like South Korea, Australia, New Zealand and Singapore.

This means China is still sending all Covid cases and their close contacts to centralized quarantine facilities and sealing off entire buildings or streets in the event of a single positive test.

China has recorded more than 760,000 new Covid cases and around 550 deaths since ultra-infectious Omicron variants breached China’s super-tight restrictions in March – although there are doubts about the reliability of the data.

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Delgado wins one, loses late in nightcap at South Central District Tournament – ​​Crescent City Sports https://northcentralconference.org/delgado-wins-one-loses-late-in-nightcap-at-south-central-district-tournament-crescent-city-sports/ Sat, 21 May 2022 04:33:42 +0000 https://northcentralconference.org/delgado-wins-one-loses-late-in-nightcap-at-south-central-district-tournament-crescent-city-sports/ NEW ORLEANS — It was a day of huge highs and lousy lows for Delgado baseball on Friday. Hosting the South Central District tournament, the Dolphins rallied from a two-point deficit to defeat Eastern Oklahoma State 4-3 at Kirsch-Rooney Stadium on Friday afternoon. Trailing 3-1 in the bottom of the sixth inning, the Dolphins sent […]]]>

NEW ORLEANS — It was a day of huge highs and lousy lows for Delgado baseball on Friday.

Hosting the South Central District tournament, the Dolphins rallied from a two-point deficit to defeat Eastern Oklahoma State 4-3 at Kirsch-Rooney Stadium on Friday afternoon.

Trailing 3-1 in the bottom of the sixth inning, the Dolphins sent nine men home as Mikey Stutes homered to make it 3-2 before Hayden Kibbe hit a single and Cade Pregeant was hit by a throw.

Jake Fury picked Kibbe at home to tie the game 3-3 before a wild pitch scored Pregeant to give the Dolphins a 4-3 lead.

Carson Lore made sure the lead held, pitching 3 2/3 innings of scoreless relief, allowing just two hits while striking out four for the win after starter Turner Toms went 5 1 /3 innings, allowing three runs on six hits.

The Mountaineers (51-5) had taken the lead with two runs in the top of the first inning on a single from Isaac Webb, who stole second and scored on an RBI single from Parker Rowland. Keniel DeLeon followed with an RBI brace and it was 2-0.

Delgado cut the deficit to 2-1 late in the first on a walk to Brayden Caskey, who stole second and scored on an RBI single from Stutes.

EOSU made it 3-1 in the top of the fourth on another double from DeLeon and an RBI single from Dalton Patten, setting the stage for Delgado’s winning rally.

Starter Easten James, the first of five Mountaineers pitchers, absorbed his first loss of the season, going 5 2/3 innings, allowing four runs on six hits.

The loss eliminated Eastern Oklahoma State as the Mountaineers lost in Friday’s opener to Crowder College, 6-4.

The final game of the day was another outstanding contest, won by Crowder 5-3 over Delgado.

The Dolphins took an early lead with a run leading first on a single from Ethan Lege, who went third on a pair of wild pitches and scored on an RBI pitch by JT Singletary.

Crowder took a 2-1 lead late in the fourth inning when Jackson Cobb was hit by a pitch and scored on an RBI double from Landrey Wilkerson to tie the game before a wild pitch scored Wilkerson.

It stayed that way until early in the eighth inning when Delgado rallied to take a 3-2 lead on a walk to Caskey, a single from Lege and a two-run double from Singletary.

The advance was short-lived.

The Roughriders brutalized Delgado closer to Kaile Levatino in the bottom of the eighth to steal the win.

Peyton Holt picked before Kenny Diclimente walked. With two outs, Wilkerson doubled two runs at home to make it 4-3 before Clayton Gray led Wilkerson with an RBI single to make it 5-3.

Conner Floyd struck out all five batters he faced in relief, striking out four for the win.

Cody Adcock started for the Roughriders and was dominant in 7 1/3 innings, allowing two runs on just three hits, walking three and striking out seven. Gage Singer was hit for a run on two hits before making way for Floyd.

Cory Cook started for Delgado, going 3 2/3 innings, allowing two runs on three hits.

Hunter Draper came in and was brilliant, pitching 3 1/3 innings, allowing no runs on a single hit with four strikeouts before Levatino came in in the bottom of the eighth inning.

“We didn’t do the things we needed to do offensively in Game 2,” Delgado coach Joe Scheuermann said. “I thought we got really roughed up in the first six or seven innings of the game. Their starter was off. We didn’t play well with him but we kept the game close. Our pitchers have done a phenomenal job of keeping us in the game. »

Delgado (36-15) must win Saturday at 4 p.m. against Crowder to force a decisive game Sunday. If the Roughriders win on Saturday, they are the champions and advance to the NJCAA World Series in Grand Junction, Colorado for a second straight year.

“They’re in the same boat as us,” Scheuermann said. “We have fresh weapons that we haven’t used. We are definitely able to come back.

FRIDAY LINE SCORES

FIRST FINAL GAME:
Crowder 202 010 001 6 9 2, 7 LOB
EOSU 004 000 000 4 10 4, 10 LOB
WP—Jacob Misiorowski (10-0)
PL—Nate Ackenhausen (8-1)
SV—Jace Presley (2)
SB—Isaac Webb-2, Drake Kerr, Jonah Cox-2
2B—Parker Rowland, Houston King, Josh Patrick
HR—Gavin Glasgow (4)
Game duration: 3:02

SECOND FINAL GAME
EOSU 200 100,000 3 8 1, 4 LOB
Delgado 100 003 00X 4 9 1, 11 LOB
WP—Carson Lore (8-4)
PL—Easten James (8-1)
SB—Brayden Caskey, Isaac Webb, Austin Albright, Drake Kerr
2B—Josh Alexander, Keniel DeLeon-2, Jonah Cox
HR—Mikey Studes (4)
Game duration: 2:31

FINAL MATCH THREE
Delgado 100,000,020 3 5 0.5 LOB
Crowd 000 200 03X 5 8 0.8 LOB
WP—Conner Floyd (2-2)
LP—Kaile Levatino (6-3)
SB—Chaz Poppy
2B—Kenny Diclemente, Landry Wilkerson-2, JT Singletary
Game duration: 2:31

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Central District of California Finds Federal Standards Prevent Claims Based on Negligence of State Law Arising from In-Flight Fuel Dump | Schnader Harrison Segal & Lewis LLP https://northcentralconference.org/central-district-of-california-finds-federal-standards-prevent-claims-based-on-negligence-of-state-law-arising-from-in-flight-fuel-dump-schnader-harrison-segal-lewis-llp/ Tue, 17 May 2022 01:22:39 +0000 https://northcentralconference.org/central-district-of-california-finds-federal-standards-prevent-claims-based-on-negligence-of-state-law-arising-from-in-flight-fuel-dump-schnader-harrison-segal-lewis-llp/ In In re Delta Air Lines, Inc.., a federal district court in California held that plaintiffs’ claims arising from state law negligence theories were implicitly preempted by federal aviation regulations (“FARs”) dealing with various aspects of the in-flight procedures. The case happened when an airliner dumped fuel as it was returning to the departure airfield […]]]>

In In re Delta Air Lines, Inc.., a federal district court in California held that plaintiffs’ claims arising from state law negligence theories were implicitly preempted by federal aviation regulations (“FARs”) dealing with various aspects of the in-flight procedures. The case happened when an airliner dumped fuel as it was returning to the departure airfield for an emergency landing after experiencing a compressor stall in one of its two engines shortly after takeoff. The plaintiffs were residents who owned properties that were allegedly damaged by the spilled fuel. In addition to the negligence claims against the airline, the plaintiffs also alleged torts unrelated to negligence, including trespassing, nuisance, ultra-hazardous activities and battery.

The airline filed a motion to dismiss in which it argued that “federal law provides the exclusive standards for determining the liability of air carriers for alleged flight safety violations.” The court agreed to dismiss plaintiffs’ negligence claims, finding that the area of ​​aviation safety (including the fuel dumping at issue here) was implicitly preempted by the FARs dealing with fuel dumping and the relevant guidance contained therein. in the airline’s FAA-approved flight manual. . The court did not reject the claims of non-negligence, finding that it was not yet clear whether the airline could be held liable for these claims even if it complied with the federal standard of care – in d’ In other words, the court found that a conflict between state and federal law was not yet apparent. The court also found that the non-negligence claims were not expressly preempted by the Airline Deregulation Act because the flight path was not a standard “route” taken by the airline. The court granted the plaintiffs leave to amend the negligence allegations in the current complaint following a subsequent determination of the applicable federal standard of care.

Although the preemption of state law product liability claims has been the most contentious and high-profile area of ​​aviation preemption law in recent years, it is important to remember that courts consider generally than in-flight operations (that is to say., equipment on landing) are subject to a federal standard of care, and thus claims arising from alleged in-flight safety violations are often ripe for arguments that federal law’s standards of care State shall give way to those set forth in the FAR.

In re Delta Air Lines, Inc.., 2021 US Dist. LEXIS 253478 (CD Cal. Nov. 19, 2021).

[View source.]

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California Central District Finds Federal Standards Prevent State Law Negligence Claims Arising from In-Flight Fuel Dump – Professional Negligence https://northcentralconference.org/california-central-district-finds-federal-standards-prevent-state-law-negligence-claims-arising-from-in-flight-fuel-dump-professional-negligence/ Mon, 16 May 2022 16:56:03 +0000 https://northcentralconference.org/california-central-district-finds-federal-standards-prevent-state-law-negligence-claims-arising-from-in-flight-fuel-dump-professional-negligence/ May 16, 2022 Schnader Harrison Segal & Lewis LLP To print this article, all you need to do is be registered or log in to Mondaq.com. In In re Delta Air Lines, Inc.., a federal district court in California held that plaintiffs’ claims arising from state law negligence theories were implicitly preempted by […]]]>

To print this article, all you need to do is be registered or log in to Mondaq.com.

In In re Delta Air Lines, Inc.., a federal district court in California held that plaintiffs’ claims arising from state law negligence theories were implicitly preempted by federal aviation regulations (“FARs”) dealing with various aspects of the in-flight procedures. The case happened when an airliner dumped fuel as it was returning to the departure airfield for an emergency landing after experiencing a compressor stall in one of its two engines shortly after takeoff. The plaintiffs were residents who owned properties that were allegedly damaged by the spilled fuel. In addition to the negligence claims against the airline, the plaintiffs also alleged torts unrelated to negligence, including trespassing, nuisance, ultra-hazardous activities and battery.

The airline filed a motion to dismiss in which it argued that “federal law provides the exclusive standards for determining the liability of air carriers for alleged flight safety violations.” The court agreed to dismiss plaintiffs’ negligence claims, finding that the area of ​​aviation safety (including the fuel dumping at issue here) was implicitly preempted by the FARs dealing with fuel dumping and the relevant guidance contained therein. in the airline’s FAA-approved flight manual. . The court did not reject the claims of non-negligence, finding that it was not yet clear whether the airline could be held liable for these claims even if it complied with the federal standard of care – in d’ In other words, the court found that a conflict between state and federal law was not yet apparent. The court also found that the non-negligence claims were not expressly preempted by the Airline Deregulation Act because the flight path was not a standard “route” taken by the airline. The court granted the plaintiffs leave to amend the negligence allegations in the current complaint following a subsequent determination of the applicable federal standard of care.

Although the preemption of state law product liability claims has been the most contentious and high-profile area of ​​aviation preemption law in recent years, it is important to remember that courts consider generally than in-flight operations (that is to say., equipment on landing) are subject to a federal standard of care, and thus claims arising from alleged in-flight safety violations are often ripe for arguments that federal law’s standards of care States shall give way to those set forth in the FAR.

In re Delta Air Lines, Inc.., 2021 US Dist. LEXIS 253478 (CD Cal. Nov. 19, 2021).

The content of this article is intended to provide a general guide on the subject. Specialist advice should be sought regarding your particular situation.

POPULAR ARTICLES ON: US Litigation, Mediation & Arbitration

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Liberty Union wins No. 1 seed in Central District tournament draw https://northcentralconference.org/liberty-union-wins-no-1-seed-in-central-district-tournament-draw/ Sun, 08 May 2022 23:32:18 +0000 https://northcentralconference.org/liberty-union-wins-no-1-seed-in-central-district-tournament-draw/ COLUMBUS – Regardless of your team’s record, tournament time is always exciting, and while there wasn’t much suspense in the draws for the Central District and Southeast District of Sunday for area high school baseball teams, it’s always interesting to know exactly where the teams will be seeded. A year ago, four regional teams — […]]]>

COLUMBUS – Regardless of your team’s record, tournament time is always exciting, and while there wasn’t much suspense in the draws for the Central District and Southeast District of Sunday for area high school baseball teams, it’s always interesting to know exactly where the teams will be seeded.

A year ago, four regional teams — Lancaster, Liberty Union, Fisher Catholic and Bloom-Carroll — won district championships. The Bulldogs ultimately lost 2-1 in 10 innings in the Division II state championship game.

It looks like it could be another banner year in tournaments for teams in the region. Liberty Union, which is ranked No. 2 in the state in the High School Baseball Coaches Association’s Division III poll, won the No. 1 seed on Sunday.

The Lions, who won the Mid-State League-Buckeye Division championship for the first time since 2003, reached the regional final in 2021.

Liberty Union has a first-round bye and will face matchup winner Marion Elgin-Africentric on May 19. Additionally, in Division III, Amanda-Clearcreek is a No. 4 seed and will host North Union on May 19. Aces are in the opposite bracket of Liberty Union.

In Division I, Lancaster, which has won three straight Central District championships and is closing in on its fourth consecutive Ohio Capital Conference title, earned a No. 3 seed and a bye to the first round. The Golden Gales will face the Westerville South-Columbus South winner at Beavers Field on May 18.

In Division II, Bloom-Carroll earned a No. 3 seed and has a bye. The Bulldogs will face either River Valley or Columbus East on May 19.

The Bulldogs opted to go in the same bracket as top-seeded Granville, and if the seeds hold, they will face the Blue Aces in the district semifinals. Jonathan Alder, the no. 4 seed, is also in the same bracket, which could set up a District Finals clash against Bloom-Carroll or Granville.

In the Southeast Division, Fairfield Union will travel to face Unioto on May 16.

In Division IV, Bern Union, fresh off winning the Mid-State League-Cardinal Division championship, secured a No. 2 seed behind top seed Newark Catholic. The Rockets will host Wellington on May 18.

Fairfield Christian Academy will host Tree of Life on May 18. If the seeds are confirmed, Bern Union and the Knights will meet in the district semifinals.

Millersport got a No. 4 seed and will host Danville, and No. 9 seed Fisher Catholic will host Granville Christian on May 18.

Tom Wilson is a sports reporter for the Lancaster Eagle Gazette. Contact him at 740-689-5150 or email twilson@gannett.com for comment or story advice. Follow him on Twitter @twil2323.

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US Senate confirms new federal judge for the Central District of California https://northcentralconference.org/us-senate-confirms-new-federal-judge-for-the-central-district-of-california/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 19:09:56 +0000 https://northcentralconference.org/us-senate-confirms-new-federal-judge-for-the-central-district-of-california/ The Central District has jurisdiction over San Luis Obispo County – The United States Senate has confirmed the nomination of President Joe Biden to the Superior Court of Los Angeles County Judge Sherilyn Peace Garnett serve as a federal district judge for the United States District Court for the Central District of California. Judge Garnett […]]]>

The Central District has jurisdiction over San Luis Obispo County

– The United States Senate has confirmed the nomination of President Joe Biden to the Superior Court of Los Angeles County Judge Sherilyn Peace Garnett serve as a federal district judge for the United States District Court for the Central District of California. Judge Garnett will preside over the cases in Los Angeles in the Western Division of the Court.

Judge Garnett has served as a judge of the Superior Court of Los Angeles County since her appointment by Governor Jerry Brown in 2014. Judge Garnett has presided over criminal cases for misdemeanors and felonies, including more than 30 trials. Additionally, from June to October 2016, she served as a pro judge on the California Court of Appeals for the Second District, Division 7. She also served on the Community Outreach and Diversity Committees of the Superior Court of California. Los Angeles County.

Prior to her appointment as a Superior Court judge, from 2001 to 2014, Judge Garnett served as an Assistant United States Attorney for the Central District of California. As Assistant United States Attorney, she investigated, charged, and prosecuted hundreds of cases, including drug trafficking, violent and organized crime, child exploitation, arson, fraud, money laundering, explosives and destructive devices, air security, fake bomb and anthrax threats, and threats against the President and protected dignitaries.

She has regularly appeared in court and handled all aspects of criminal proceedings, including defending pre-trial motions, conducting trials, and handling appeals before the United States Court of Appeals for the ninth circuit. From 2008 to 2011, she worked in the National Security Section, where she served as the Domestic Terrorism Coordinator for the Central District of California. In 2011, she joined the General Crimes Section, where she served as Deputy Chief and then Section Chief. Additionally, while serving as an Assistant United States Attorney, she taught a legal writing and oral advocacy course at the USC Gould School of Law from 2008 to 2010.

Prior to joining the United States Attorney’s Office, Judge Garnett worked as an associate at Arnold & Porter, LLC from 1999 to 2000. There she argued a variety of civil matters involving, among others, insurance law, contract disputes and product liability. From 1998 to 1999, Judge Garnett served as law clerk to the Honorable Barry Ted Moskowitz in the United States District Court for the Southern District of California. After law school, from 1995 to 1998, Justice Garnett worked as an associate at Altheimer & Gray, LLP, where she specialized in civil litigation.

Throughout her career, Justice Garnett has been involved with several bar associations and judges. She has also dedicated time to educating and empowering youth by speaking on panels, teaching and mentoring students and new lawyers. Justice Garnett received her Bachelor of Arts, with distinction, from the University of California, Riverside in 1991, and her Juris Doctor degree from Harvard Law School in 1995.

Judge Garnett fills the vacancy that arose when the late District Judge Manuel L. Real assumed senior status in November 2018. Including the appointment of Judge Garnett, the Central District of California has 28 licensed judge positions under Article III, five of which are currently vacant.

The Central District of California includes Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, Ventura, Santa Barbara, and San Luis Obispo counties. It serves more than 19.3 million people, or nearly half of the state of California’s population.

About the Author: News Staff

The Paso Robles Daily News news team wrote or edited this story based on local contributors and news releases. The press team can be contacted at info@pasoroblesdailynews.com.

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Illinois v. 3M Company PFAS Pollution Case Moved to the Central District of Illinois https://northcentralconference.org/illinois-v-3m-company-pfas-pollution-case-moved-to-the-central-district-of-illinois/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 14:35:10 +0000 https://northcentralconference.org/illinois-v-3m-company-pfas-pollution-case-moved-to-the-central-district-of-illinois/ On Thursday, defendant 3M filed a removal notice remove the case of Illinois vs. 3M Company in the United States District Court for the Central District of Illinois. The Illinois Attorney General filed the original complaint in the Illinois State Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit against 3M for the release, emission, placement, disposal, […]]]>

On Thursday, defendant 3M filed a removal notice remove the case of Illinois vs. 3M Company in the United States District Court for the Central District of Illinois. The Illinois Attorney General filed the original complaint in the Illinois State Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit against 3M for the release, emission, placement, disposal, leak, spill and/or abandonment of perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS).

According to the complaint, 3M is a Delaware company that has owned and operated a manufacturing facility along the banks of the Mississippi River in Cordova, Illinois since 1970. Additionally, the complaint states that the Cordova facility is located on 740 acres with approximately 1.2 miles of river frontage.

The complaint alleges that 3M produces and uses several different PFASs at its Cordova plant. Further, the complaint states that PFAS are toxic man-made chemicals that are harmful to public health, safety and welfare, and the environment. The complaint further states that because of the harm caused by PFAS to human health and the environment, the U.S. EPA, Illinois EPA, and Illinois Department of Natural Resources have established strict regulations and guidelines for the use, disposal and storage of PFAS.

The State of Illinois alleges that 3M has caused significant PFAS contamination and pollution in the Mississippi River and surrounding waters, sediments, soil and air around its Cordova facility. Specifically, the complaint alleges that 3M dumped PFAS-containing waste directly into the Mississippi River, improperly disposed of PFAS-containing sludge, released airborne PFAS, and spilled and leaked PFAS from containers, of piping systems, tanks and its wastewater treatment process. Additionally, the complaint states that samples from the Cordova plant manufacturing area found PFAS levels significantly higher than current Illinois EPA health advisory levels and quality standards. proposed groundwater.

Additionally, plaintiff argues that 3M has continually attempted to deny the adverse effects of PFAS on the environment and human health and has intentionally concealed the dangers of PFAS from government entities, including the State of Illinois and its agencies. Plaintiff contends that 3M concealed the dangers of PFAS and continued to manufacture and use PFAS at the Cordova plant to protect profits and avoid public liability for injury and damage caused by their toxic products.

Complaint alleges that 3M’s negligent, intentional and reckless use of PFAS resulted in significant damage to property and natural resources in Illinois and put Illinois residents at risk of adverse health effects . Accordingly, Illinois brings this action against 3M under the Illinois Environmental Protection Act, the Illinois Department of Resources Act, the Illinois negligence, trespass, common nuisance and unjust enrichment and seeks compensatory damages, statutory penalties, injunctive relief, prejudgment interest and costs.

The plaintiff is represented by the Attorney General of Illinois, DiCello Levitt Gutzler LLC, Keating Muething & Klekamp PLL and SARL Fields. The defendant is represented by Mayer Brown LLP.

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Affordable Homeownership Development Completed in Central District https://northcentralconference.org/affordable-homeownership-development-completed-in-central-district/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 https://northcentralconference.org/affordable-homeownership-development-completed-in-central-district/ by Elizabeth Turnbull On Tuesday morning, local leaders and community members celebrated the completion of an affordable housing development in the Central District that specifically aims to make owning a home financially viable for residents. As part of a concerted action against gentrification in the Central District and to combat rapidly rising housing costs, the […]]]>

by Elizabeth Turnbull


On Tuesday morning, local leaders and community members celebrated the completion of an affordable housing development in the Central District that specifically aims to make owning a home financially viable for residents.

As part of a concerted action against gentrification in the Central District and to combat rapidly rising housing costs, the Village gardens the development consists of six market-priced units and 10 affordable homes.

Local leaders such as Mayor Bruce Harrell, Councilor Teresa Mosqueda and Africatown Community Land Trust CEO K. Wyking Garrett spoke about the significance of the buildings and the community’s efforts to bring them to life.

“The ability to homeownership in this city is one of the only ways we can continue to fight the racist history of redlining that still plagues cities like Seattle across the country,” Mosqueda said. “Homeownership is the antidote not only to redlining, but also to the racist bank lending strategies, the zoning covenants that exist in the city, and the inability for people to lift themselves out of generational poverty. .”

Africatown Community Land Trust CEO K. Wyking Garrett speaks during a ceremony April 26, 2022 celebrating the completion of the Village Gardens housing development. (Photo: Susan Fried)

The majority of affordable housing is available for residents who earn less than 80% of the area’s median income, and two of the units are available for people who earn 60% of the median income and are experiencing housing insecurity.

The homes are located at the corner of Yakima Avenue South and South Irving Street, on land provided by the City of Seattle, which provided financing alongside the state and the Federal Home Loan Bank.

Homestead Community Land Trust, Edge Developers and Africatown Community Land Trust played a key role in creating the project itself.

At a time in Seattle’s history when many homes cost close to a million dollars, affordable condo units in Village Gardens range from around $230,000 to $300,000. For the time being, housing at market price has not been priced on The village garden website.

As well as being affordable, the development has prioritized sustainability and environmental friendliness, as all units aim to meet a specific environmental standard and are fossil fuel free.

Gentrification in the Central District—following a history of redlining that has prevented many families of color from buying homes in the district—has specifically contributed to a decline in black homeownership, and units could providing a small push against similar moves in the present day as people with historical ties to the neighborhood will be offered a first chance to buy a home.

Photo showing TraeAnna Holiday speaking into a microphone on a podium.
TraeAnna Holiday, Creative Director of King County Equity Now, speaks at a ceremony April 26, 2022 celebrating the completion of the Village Gardens housing development. (Photo: Susan Fried)

TraeAnna Holiday, a local activist, creative director of King County Equity Now and well-known host of Converge Media, spoke about her personal experience and the change and gentrification she has seen since.

“My mother and I were going down on the 23 [Ave] for years and just crying because we just didn’t recognize it as our city. Vacation said. “[This housing] is an example of so many that we hope to return to, with all the new policies and legislation that are passed, being intentional to do things that repair this past damage, literally providing reparations across the land and through projects like this one .”


Editor’s note: This article has been updated to clarify that the history of redlining is preventing families of color from buying homes.


Elizabeth Turnbull is a journalist with reporting experience in the United States and the Middle East. She has a passion for covering human-centric issues and doing it consistently.

📸 The featured image: (Left to right) Seattle City Council Member Teresa Mosqueda, Africatown Community Land Trust CEO K. Wyking Garrett, King County Equity Now Creative Director TraeAnna Holiday, and Seattle Mayor Bruce Harrell attend an April 26, 2022 celebration for the completion of Village Gardens, an affordable homeownership development in Seattle’s Central District. (Photo: Susan Fried)

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Police shoot gun-toting suspect in downtown Seattle https://northcentralconference.org/police-shoot-gun-toting-suspect-in-downtown-seattle/ Fri, 22 Apr 2022 14:21:56 +0000 https://northcentralconference.org/police-shoot-gun-toting-suspect-in-downtown-seattle/ Seattle Downtown shooting investigation Seattle police are investigating a shooting in the Central District. SEATTLE – Seattle police are investigating a shooting near the downtown area of ​​Seattle that injured a suspect on Friday morning, Officers responded to reports of gunfire in the area of ​​the 1400 block of East Yesler Way after 4:30 a.m. […]]]>

Seattle police are investigating a shooting near the downtown area of ​​Seattle that injured a suspect on Friday morning,

Officers responded to reports of gunfire in the area of ​​the 1400 block of East Yesler Way after 4:30 a.m.

When officers arrived, they heard screams and gunshots. A SWAT team responded shortly after.

According to the Seattle Police Department, officers entered an apartment complex and located the suspect, who was armed with a rifle, and shot the suspect.

The suspect was beaten, surrendered and taken into custody. He was taken to Harborview Medical Center for treatment.

The Seattle Department of Transportation said the investigation blocked all lanes on East Yesler Way from 12th Avenue South to 17th Avenue South. Car service from First Hill Street has been discontinued.

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The investigation is still ongoing.

]]> 2D Cafe joins the Greater Central District – The Crow’s Nest at USF St. Petersburg https://northcentralconference.org/2d-cafe-joins-the-greater-central-district-the-crows-nest-at-usf-st-petersburg/ Mon, 18 Apr 2022 15:04:17 +0000 https://northcentralconference.org/2d-cafe-joins-the-greater-central-district-the-crows-nest-at-usf-st-petersburg/ The black and white cartoon theme, designed and painted by local artist Chad Mize, gives the illusion of being inside a coloring book. Courtesy of Sophia George | The Crow’s Nest By Sophie Georges the 2d cafe, St. Petersburg’s newest addition to its quirky small business lineup, offers a traditional European-style cafe experience with an […]]]>

The black and white cartoon theme, designed and painted by local artist Chad Mize, gives the illusion of being inside a coloring book.

Courtesy of Sophia George | The Crow’s Nest


By Sophie Georges

the 2d cafe, St. Petersburg’s newest addition to its quirky small business lineup, offers a traditional European-style cafe experience with an artistic twist.

With its grand opening on April 8, the 2D Cafe –– owned by Maria Merello and his wife Maria Kyriakidou –– is an immersive monochromatic space that makes both customers and the cafe’s offerings standout pops of color amid a black and white room.

The space was designed and hand painted by a renowned local artist Chad Mizewhich gives it a special connection with the rich artistic culture of Saint Petersburg.

Dining options at 2D Cafe include coffee, freshly baked pastries, salads and sandwiches, and there are plans to expand the menu to meet a wider range of customer needs.

“We want to add more gluten-free and vegan items just to have more options for anyone with dietary restrictions,” said general manager Alex Campbell. The Crow’s Nest.

General Manager Alex Campbell worked closely with owners Maria Merello and Maria Kyriakidou to bring 2D Café to life. Courtesy of Sophia George | The Crow’s Nest.

According to Campbell, 2D cafes and restaurants have grown in popularity in America since they first appeared about five years ago in Asia and Europe.

“[Merello and Kyriakidou] are travelers from all over the world and on one of their trips they opened a Forbes magazine and saw a spread about one of the first 2D cafes that was created in Japan, and they thought that was a really cool idea,” Campbell said..

Merello and Kyriakidou had the idea of ​​bringing a 2D restaurant experience to Florida for two years and originally wanted to open one in Orlando.

2D Cafe is located in the Grand Central District of St. Petersburg, an area that has seen tremendous growth in business and population in recent years. Courtesy of Sophia George | The Crow’s Nest.

“Since St. Petersburg has had so much success and population growth, [Merello and Kyriakidou] actually thought it would be the perfect location, and then it was just about solidifying the location,” Campbell said.

2D Cafe is located at 2105 Central Ave., which was once home to Swah-Rey in the Grand Central District.

The Grand Central District –– which stretches First Avenue South, Central Avenue and First Avenue North from 16th Street North to 31st Street North –– is a hotspot for arts and entertainment and is home to local antique shops, bars, restaurants and art galleries.

Closing the location in December, it took only three months for Merello, Kyriakidou and their team to create and open the doors of their new business.

Campbell said The Crow’s Nest that the cafe’s opening week was a whirlwind, but praised locals and nearby business owners as “an army of nice people” who helped get them on their feet.



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